PE4KH Amateur radio - Koos van den Hout

Most recent QSO's for PE4KH

Callsign Band Mode Locator RST(R) RST(S) Satellite
2E0FQT20MFT8IO93-18-15
G3EJS20MFT8IO92-06-06
M0NYW20MFT8IO91-08-08
M7SZO20MFT8IO91-15+00
S50XX20MFT8JN65-15-15
PD1GJB2MFT8JO22jv-24-17
OZ7PBI20MFT8JO45-16-08
HA8FM20MCWKN06ag599599
LY175Z20MCW599599
YL2FT15MFT8KO26-12-07
OH1KAG15MFT8KP11-14-06
EI5KG15MFT8IO62-03-01
OG2A15MFT8KP11pa-10-17
AM40LAR15MFT8JN11cj-11-11
OH4YA15MFT8KP42-10-19

I passed my novice radio amateur exam in March 2013 and I registered the callsign PD4KH (pappa delta four kilo hotel!). I passed my full radio amateur exam in March 2016 and I registered the callsign PE4KH (pappa echo four kilo hotel!).
PE4KH on qrz.com

I am usually located around maidenhead locator: JO22NC

QSL policy for PE4KH

I upload logs to eQSL.cc and ARRL Logbook of the World, during and after being active on the radio. I upload logs to www.qrz.com and clublog on a regular basis. I like paper cards via the QSL bureau so I send those out when requested or when I think the other party will appriciate one and I will respond when I receive a card. You can also request a card via the Log Search on clublog for PE4KH using the OQRS service. Notifying me via e-mail that you would like a card is also possible.

I appreciate SWL reports for QSOs and will respond.

gallery of eQSL cards received by PD4KH, PE4KH, PE4KH/P, DL/PE4KH.

Articles

Antenna rotor project
Amateur Satellites
D-Star digitale amateur radio (Nederlands)

Maps

Recent contact (QSO) map for PE4KH embedded using google maps
gcmwin for linux maps with gridsquares contacted (red) and confirmed (blue) :
Mapped HF contacts by PE4KH
Mapped 10M contacts by PE4KH
Mapped 15M contacts by PE4KH
Mapped 17M contacts by PE4KH
Mapped 20M contacts by PE4KH
Mapped 30M contacts by PE4KH
Mapped 40M contacts by PE4KH
Mapped 60M contacts by PE4KH
Mapped 80M contacts by PE4KH
Mapped 2M contacts by PE4KH
Mapped 70CM contacts by PE4KH
Mapped satellite contacts by PE4KH

The 'hamradio' items from my homepage

2020-05-27 PMR channels have been expanded. In 2018, but I found out today
It's been a very long time since I was busy with pure radio frequency scanning. Being active on the sending side too has made me less interested in frequencies where I can only listen.

But recently I was looking at what is available, and noticed the marine VHF channels. I could program them all in a scanner, but I decided to use software defined radio to see if anything is active in that band. Late in the evening there is currently no activity.

But I set a scanner to scan all known channels and heard some chatter on PMR channels. On one channel was a remark that there was interference and they should switch to channel 14.

In my memory analog PMR had 8 channels. So I looked it up and found out analog PMR was expanded to 16 channels on 1 January 2018. There is also DMR446 (same frequencies but with time division multiple access) on the same frequencies and dPMR446 with 32 possible frequencies in the same range.

So now the scanner is updated with the new analog frequencies and I can hear a baby monitor, motorcycle driving lessons and a building site.

2020-05-24 Going for countries on other amateur bands
In the past few days I used the long-wire antenna with tuner to get on 'other' amateur bands. I added contacts on the 17 and 15 meter bands to several countries around my country. Some of those countries were new on those bands, so that's nice.

No spectaculair new distances or countries, but a good flow of new contacts.

2020-05-24 Shared my script to optimize outgoing QSL cards
As a radio amateur I like sending and receiving QSL cards. QSL is the Q-code for "I confirm reception" and a QSL card is the way to confirm a contact. I have my own QSL card design and a big box of cards to send out.

With contacts I usually do a check if a fellow amateur mentions the wish for cards via the QSL bureau on her/his qrz.com page, because I only want to send cards to interested amateurs. Due to the way I process my cards I can put up to 4 contacts on one card, so it's a simple optimization that if I have one contact that I want to send a card for I also check for other contacts with the same callsign. The qslmaximizer.pl script does this for the CQRLOG database.

2020-05-17 New countries in the log, now waiting for confirmation
Two new countries in the log, now the wait is for the amateurs on the other side to confirm the contact via Logbook of the World. Or maybe not, but both seemed solid contacts.

First was to the island of Curacao, part of the Netherlands Antilles. A lot of Dutch stations will have Curacao in the log because the Americas are the 'easy' DX but with my antenna position it has always been easier to get to the east.

Second one was to Kenia, which was a sort of surprise contact, I suddenly saw signals from a station there without any other indication that there was an opening towards Africa.

In other amateur radio experiences I've also had some really nice 10 meter openings recently. This is remarkable at the bottom of the sunspot cycle, but I guess sporadic E and other special propagation modes help. So I got some new countries on 10 meter. Earlier North Macedonia and today Albania.

2020-05-03 New country in the log: St. Lucia
St Lucia on OpenStreetMap, map by OpenStreetMap contributors In my earlier activity on the 60 meter band I had a "maybe" contact to St. Lucia. This is one of the islands in the West Indies in the Eastern Carribian Sea.

But in the end the "maybe" contact was no contact. Ok, fine with me, on to the next chance. That happened Friday evening in a 10 meter opening: I came to the radio with the computer decoding FT8 signals ready to go to bed, but I saw J68HZ active as only non-European station, answering European stations. So I had to try!

After a number of tries I got a reply with a very weak signal report, so I kept my fingers crossed for the next exchange and it came, closing the contact. And the next evening the contact was confirmed, giving me a new DXCC entity.

2020-05-01 Time for a plot of the number of contacts in amateur radio after a busy month
QSO count plot up to April 2020 Time for a new plot of the number of radio contacts. As usual contest months are quite visible and January is for me the month with the most contests.

But April 2020 is also quite visible. This last week I had a lot of time for radio due to holiday and not going anywhere. And other radio amateurs also had the time to be active, so there were a lot of new calls to get in the log. Combined with a good 10 meter band opening this added to a high number of contacts for a month with only one contest.

2020-05-01 I'm not intimidated by morse anymore
Today I "chased" the special amateur radio call for the Bulgarian Saint of this month, LZ177GL.

The Bulgarian Saints are a set of special amateur radio calls each month, organized in Bulgaria by Bulgarian Radio Club BLAGOVESTNIK LZ1KCP. The callsigns are in honour of saints from the orthodox church.

LZ177GL was calling CQ at a rate of about 28 words per minute. My current rate is 12-13 words per minute, so that's quite a lot faster. But it doesn't intimidate me anymore, I can hear the callsign on a few repeats, I can hear when the return is with my full callsign and a 5NN (signal report) or a part of my callsign and a question mark. Or when the answer is for another station. And that's enough to make the contact with the absolute minimum information, exchanging callsigns and signal reports. When I'm convinced my callsign got across I send '5NN TU 73' to finish the contact.

I also made some other contacts in morse because I could hear CQ calls and was able to decode them by ear together with some help from fldigi. So my conclusion is that morse isn't "intimidating" anymore. I can understand enough to get an idea what is going on and use it.

2020-04-29 More 10 meter band fun
This month is somewhere near the absolute minimum of the solar cycle but today FT8 is active on the 10 meter band. I listened to other things on the 10 meter band but when I heard some morse I soon found out it was a beacon from Italy. It would have been nice to do some other mode than ft8 on the band.

But I made the possible FT8 contacts and got bigger distances than yesterday. In the evening I got Asiatic Russia and Belarus in the log.

2020-04-28 A nice 10 meter opening this afternoon
I'm at home at the moment with a few days off from work. Time to play some radio, and with the current stay at home measures there are a lot of stations active.

I spun the dial to the 10 meter band this afternoon and heard signals. There was a nice E-skip opening to Spain and I even decoded some signals from Brazil. With normal ionospheric propagation South-America isn't that hard for most of the Dutch HF amateurs, but it's usually my difficult corner. I made several contacts with stations in Southern Europe, including AM2WARD so that's a new slot in the IARU 95th anniversary stations as organized by the Spanish radio amateurs.

In the weekend I had contacts with other stations part of that activity, including several in morse. Those stations are using fast computer-generated morse so I can't decode everything 'live' but by now I do know what 'PE4KH 5NN' sounds like at rather high speeds.

2020-04-19 Going horizontal on 2 meters FT8
For all of my FT8 contacts from home until now I used the vertical diamond X-300N antenna on the roof. Most 2 meter DX stations will use a directional horizontal antenna, so I lose some signal when I try to communicate with them.

So last weekend I put the Arrow satellite antenna in the attic pointing out the window with the 2 meter elements in horizontal mode. Pointing out this window means southeast direction so I hoped to make some DX contacts into Germany or beyond.

Beyond did not happen, there was no special propagation on the 2 meter band. But the furthest contact was with DJ5FI with a distance of 360 kilometers. I'll try this again when there is special propagation in that direction.

Items before 2020-04-19
This page is created by Koos van den Hout, reachable via e-mail as my callsign @ idefix.net.
Other webprojects: Weatherstation Utrecht Overvecht, Camp Wireless, wireless Internet access at campsites The Virtual Bookcase book reviews
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