PE4KH Amateur radio - Koos van den Hout

Most recent QSO's for PE4KH

Callsign Band Mode Locator RST(R) RST(S)
9A6DJM20MJT65JN65-03-01
PB2RVS2MFMJO21RR5856
OK2BOX20MJT65JN99-11-09
F4FZR20MJT65JN25-05-03
F8KFQ20MJT65JN03-07-03
SP5SR20MPSK63KO02ML599599
G3ZCH20MPSK31IO83UN599599
DJ2BH20MPSK31JO32XG599599
IV3JER20MPSK31JN66LB599599
DK4NW20MPSK31JN59LL599599
DL/ON4IPA20MPSK63JO54MK599599
OZ/EA2ECV20MPSK31JO65GS599599
UT4U20MRTTY599599
S57YK20MRTTYJN65UM599599
UX0SX20MRTTYKN28IW599599

I passed my novice radio amateur exam in March 2013 and I registered the callsign PD4KH (pappa delta four kilo hotel!). I passed my full radio amateur exam in March 2016 and I registered the callsign PE4KH (pappa echo four kilo hotel!).
PE4KH on qrz.com
PE4KH on hamqth.com

I am usually located around maidenhead locator: JO22NC

The 'hamradio' items from my homepage

2017-03-26 Going full-duplex with amateur satellites, part 1: introduction and I bought the hardware
I still want to get active on amateur satellites again, but the main reason is that the amount of work per contact is a lot more than for example in a digimode contest. But I still want to make those 'special' contacts, especially when the amount of local radio noise on HF is bothering me.

One of the most important improvements in making contacts on amateur satellites is working 'full duplex', meaning receiving signals while transmitting. The expensive way to reach that goal is buying a second amateur radio capable of receiving in FM and SSB modes in the 2 meter and 70 centimeter amateur bands and having computer aided tuning so gpredict can control the receiving frequency.

The less expensive way to reach that goal is using software defined radio. The good news is that Gqrx SDR can be controlled by other software which as the page shows is intended for remote control by Gpredict. All I needed now was reception hardware. Since the first RTL-SDR device I bought is always in use for receiving ADS-B signals from airplanes I decided to buy another cheap one to get me started. So it was on the shopping list for a recent visit to a hamfest.

At the hamfest I found a RTL-SDR stick with mcx connector and an mcx to bnc cable. But the same guy also sold cheap low(ish) noise amplifiers with SMA connectors and a 9V battery connector for power. So at one of the booths selling cable assemblies I found an mcx to male sma cable and a female sma to bnc cable, and a male to male sma cable.

The plan is to put this all together in some metal case to shield the lna from the outside world. Maybe also shield the amplifier from the RTL-SDR stick so it won't pick up any extra noise.

Should this work it would be possible to think of an upgrade with better SDR hardware and/or a pre-amplifier at the antenna side.
RTL-SDR stick and BNC cable - KvdHout on FlickrRTL-SDR stick and BNC cable
LNA and extra cables - KvdHout on FlickrLNA and extra cables

2017-03-05 Back from a short holiday where I was active with amateur radio
We stayed in a holiday park in Germany for 6 days and I decided to bring radio, tuner and the 6-40m antenna. So I was DL/PE4KH for a week and operated PSK modes a few times.

In total I made 11 contacts. The 'radio environment' was about as noisy as I am used to at home so no improvement there. Disconnecting the power supply for the television and the cable modem in the bungalow helped a bit in reducing the radio noise.

The interesting part was on Thursday evening when I only heard noise on the 40 meter band and decided to give 80 meter a try. It was active with PSK signals, including from callsigns I recognize as regulars on 20 and 40 meter PSK. My best guess is that 40 meters was unavailable for others too! The interesting part was that the antenna tuner was able to tune the LW-10 antenna for 80 meter. I do guess a lot of power was lost in the tuner as I only was able to make contacts with stations that came in very strong for me.

For the next time:

2017-02-24 Seeing the same amateur stations in contests
As I process the eqsl confirmations that come in after the Russian Worldwide PSK contest 2017 I start to notice some callsigns are showing up regularly in (digimode) contests. My highest number of confirmed contacts via eqsl which are related to contesting come from YO9AGN, S58X, S51AF, RA3GZ, HG3FMZ, EA3HKA, 9A4FS.

But the number one callsign I have confirmed via eqsl is not a contest station but the Veron club station PI4AA where I try to call in to the net almost every month.

2017-02-20 I participated in the Russian Worldwide PSK contest 2017
This weekend I had time to use the radio and after trying to get some more contacts on the 30 meter band Friday evening I decided to participate in the ongoing digimode contest in the weekend. This was the weekend of the Russian Worldwide PSK contest 2017 (https TLS certificate is broken at the moment).

I had fun doing it, had 124 contacts in the contest. I now have two new countries in the log: Kuwait and Suriname. And Kuwait already confirmed via Logbook of The World. I just uploaded the log (with the last contact rejected as it was too late):
Band  QSOs Dupes Points Mults
160      0     0      0     0
80       0     0      0     0
40      52     0    320    28
20      71     0    223    33
15       0     0      0     0
10       0     0      0     0
======================================
Total  123     0    543    61
Claimed score is 33123 points
Comparing it to my results in the Russian WW PSK contest 2015 I did a lot better. At that time I still had limited access to the 40 meter band which limited my options for PSK traffic.

2017-02-15 JT65/JT9 on 30 meters, even getting a new US contact
Today I threw out the longwire antenna and tuned it for the 30 meter amateur band (10.100 - 10.150 MHz). I first tried the PSK part of the band but that was completely silent. I tried the JT65/JT9 part, and that part was buzzing. And beeping, and other sounds. I made several contacts in Europe in the morning which was as expected. But in the evening the computer/radio was still running and I noticed some US callsigns, and answered one, and had a JT9 contact with K8SIA.

After that it was time to get the longwire antenna back in the house again. All in all another good experience with the 30 meter band.

2017-02-12 Rising number of amateur radio contacts
I noticed recently the number of radio contacts made by my new callsign PE4KH which I started using in March 2016 was getting close to the number of radio contacts made by my previous callsign PD4KH between March 2013 and March 2016. A typical rise in contacts, mostly due to my skills improving and participating in contests. So I wanted to view the rise per month and did some searching how to ask the cqrlog databases and plot the results.

Oh, and now PE4KH has more contacts after a few new contacts logged in PSK31 mode on the 20 meter band today.

2017-02-06 I participated a bit in the Vermont QSO party
Vermont counties map
Vermont Counties map, from Vermont county map - Wikimedia
I still try to make radio contacts to far away places even with current radio propagation at low levels. At the moment the last hours of the afternoon before sunset seem to give options towards the west (USA and Canada).

Last week I got home early one day, fired up the radio for PSK31 on 20 meters and saw K2EQ again.

This Sunday I saw in the fldigi screen:
CQ Vermont QSO Party K1VMT K1VMT
and answered with my call without having any idea what the Vermont QSO party is about, but having Vermont in the log would mean a new US state.

The exchange was made and I dug up from the noise that the answer included LAMoille which is a county in Vermont. It all made a lot more sense when I viewed the Vermont QSO party website. I kept an eye open for CQ's from other Vermont stations but never saw any. So I entered my log with one entry for the Vermont QSO party.

2017-01-27 Nice neighbours sharing their weather readings
A posting about reading 433.920 MHz signals triggered the idea I had ages ago to decode those signals and see what weather stations are available nearby. The original posting 433,92Mhz ontvangen (Dutch) was about receiving remote controls (KlikAanKlikUit) and had a screenshot of some Linux software for receiving those signals but no name of the software (that would be useful information).

But a simple google search found me rtl_433 on github which receives and decodes all kinds of signals on 433.922 MHz.

I downloaded it on the raspberry pi for radio experiments, and it is working fine receiving weather information from probably nearby weather stations. At least one outside temperature and humidity sensor, one inside temperature and humidity and one wind and temperature sensor. This last one could be nice for my weather station!
2017-01-27 21:00:27 :   HIDEKI Wind sensor
        Rolling Code:    15
        Channel:         4
        Battery:         OK
        Temperature:     3.6 C
        Wind Strength:   5.31 km/h
        Direction:       67.5 °
and a rain sensor:
2017-01-27 21:01:05 :   HIDEKI Rain sensor
        Rolling Code:    0
        Channel:         4
        Battery:         OK
        Rain:    648.2 mm
Thanks for sharing, neighbours!

2017-01-20 APRS on the Raspberry Pi: trying to decode APRS packets
So the mobilinkd is now connected to serial over bluetooth on the Raspberry Pi, but now to get APRS data into aprx.

So far aprx does start but I see absolutely no data coming in, even when aprsdroid will see traffic. Something strange.
koos@joy:~ $ sudo aprx -v
2017-01-20 22:05:10.593 aprx start - 2.9.0
2017-01-20 22:05:10.594 TTY /dev/rfcomm0 opened
2017-01-20 22:05:20.624 CONNECT APRSIS aprsc.pa4tw.nl:14580
^C
2017-01-20 22:18:06.115 aprx ending (SIG 2) - 2.9.0
2017-01-20 22:18:06.116 aprx ending (SIG 2) - 2.9.0
It's a good thing aprsc.pa4tw.nl has an IPv6 address as this Raspberry Pi is only configured for IPv6.

Testing with minicom on /dev/rfcomm0 does show the startup messages from the mobilinkd but absolutely no APRS data in KISS format,,,
== BeRTOS AVR/Mobilinkd TNC2
== Version 2.0.1.571
== Voltage: 4019mV
== Starting.
Switching the mobilinkd between the Raspberry Pi and the smartphone with aprsdroid does seem to confuse something, it's not always showing data in aprsdroid either.

Installing the Linux ax25-tools and using kissattach and configuring aprx to use that interface doesn't help either.

Back to the KISS over serial port over bluetooth config I changed the setting 'bluetooth tracking' on the mobilinkd, which is advised for digipeater setups. And now I am seeing something:
koos@joy:~ $ sudo aprx -v
2017-01-20 23:12:17.568 aprx start - 2.9.0
2017-01-20 23:12:17.569 TTY /dev/rfcomm0 opened
9621    PE4KH-8   R     DB0NY>APZ17,DB0KX-2*,PE0FK-10*,PI1SHB*,PA7J-2*,WIDE2*,PI1APU*,LOCAL:!5103.84N/00736.63E#www.g07.de
2017-01-20 23:12:30.378 CONNECT APRSIS aprsc.pa4tw.nl:14580
9728    PE4KH-8   R     PI1APU>APND13:>W3,NL7      PAradigm    operation!
9831    PE4KH-8   R     PA3BXR-9>UQ5QW1,PA7J-2*,WIDE1*,PI1APU*,WIDE2-1:`zDKnA8>/]"3m}431.275MHz=
9867    PE4KH-8   R     PI1SHB>APRX29,PI1APU*,WIDE2-1:!5142.02N/00520.78E#PHG3460/2m Digi/IGate 's-Hertogenbosch
9934    PE4KH-8   R     PA5JB>APU25N,PE2KDK*,PI1APU*,WIDE2*:>202317zDX: PI1SHB 51.42.02N 5.20.78E 76.3km 133� 23:13
9942    PE4KH-8   R     PI1DFT>APMI01,PI1SHB*,PI1APU*,WIDE2*:@202317z5159.70N/00420.17E#WX3IN1 Digipeater 2 mtr. pi1dft ziggo.nl
10007   PE4KH-8   R     PI1APV-2>APMI04,PI1DFT*,PA7J-2*,WIDE1*,PI1APU*,LOCAL:@202318z5130.81N/00344.00EI digi vliegveld MIDDEN ZEELAND
10018   PE4KH-8   R     DB0OTV-2>APOT21,DB0KX-2*,PE0FK-10*,PI1SHB*,PI1APU*,WIDE2*:>FILL IN DIGI + D-Star + C4FM QRG = 439,500 MHz -7,6 MHz
10122   PE4KH-8   R     PE9R>APX204,PI1APU*,WIDE2-1:=5202.5 N/00439.0 E-PHG2290QRV PI6NOS/ PI2NOS
10175   PE4KH-8   R     PA7J-2>APMI01,PI1APU*,WIDE2*:@210000z5149.68N/00450.43E-WX3IN1 PA7J Digi & I-gate Hardinxveld
10209   PE4KH-8   R     PD0JAC-10>UQ4XS8,PI1SHB*,PI1APU*,WIDE2-1:`{Mym>5#/>"4/}=
10227   PE4KH-8   R     PA3BI-10>APRS,PI1DFT*,WIDE1*,PA7J-2*,WIDE2*,PI1APU*,LOCAL:!5214.65N/00426.30E-000/000www.isemann.nl/A=000696
10277   PE4KH-8   R     PI1APV-2>APMI04,PI1DFT*,PA7J-2*,WIDE2*,PI1APU*,LOCAL::PI1APV-2 :BITS.11111111,Telemetry
10316   PE4KH-8   R     PI1SHB>APRX29,PI1APU*,WIDE2-1:!5142.02N/00520.78E#PHG3460/2m Digi/IGate 's-Hertogenbosch
And the results are showing up via the aprsc dashboard on aprsc.pa4tw.nl. Almost all packets I receive and forward are rejected as duplicate packets, but I have seen some packets accepted. So I guess I'm not really needed as an I-gate.

2017-01-20 APRS on the Raspberry Pi: talking to the mobilinkd
So I want to run APRS on the Raspberry Pi. My ultimate goal is to announce the meeting of our local radio club over 2 meter APRS but I will start with just playing "I-gate" which means I receive messages over the air and forward them to the nearest APRS server on the Internet which will then probably reject them because I'm not the only one receiving them.

The first step is to link the Raspberry Pi to a radio. The easiest way is (in my opinion) to link using the mobilinkd which uses serial over bluetooth, something the Raspberry understands.

I looked up how to use bluetooth on the raspberry and found Installing Bluetooth - Raspberry Pi Projects but using the suggested graphical tools requires a lot of packages:
koos@joy:~ $ sudo apt-get install bluetooth bluez blueman
Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree       
Reading state information... Done
bluez is already the newest version.
bluez set to manually installed.
The following extra packages will be installed:
  adwaita-icon-theme at-spi2-core colord colord-data dconf-gsettings-backend
  dconf-service fontconfig fontconfig-config fonts-dejavu-core fonts-droid
  gconf-service gconf2-common ghostscript gir1.2-appindicator3-0.1
  gir1.2-atk-1.0 gir1.2-freedesktop gir1.2-gconf-2.0 gir1.2-gdkpixbuf-2.0
  gir1.2-glib-2.0 gir1.2-gtk-3.0 gir1.2-notify-0.7 gir1.2-pango-1.0
  glib-networking glib-networking-common glib-networking-services
  gnome-icon-theme gsettings-desktop-schemas gsfonts hicolor-icon-theme
  imagemagick-common indicator-application libappindicator3-1 libasyncns0
  libatk-bridge2.0-0 libatk1.0-0 libatk1.0-data libatspi2.0-0 libavahi-client3
  libbluetooth3 libcairo-gobject2 libcairo2 libcanberra-gtk3-0
  libcanberra-gtk3-module libcanberra0 libcolord2 libcolorhug2 libcroco3
  libcups2 libcupsfilters1 libcupsimage2 libdatrie1 libdbus-glib-1-2
  libdbusmenu-glib4 libdbusmenu-gtk3-4 libdconf1 libexif12 libfftw3-double3
  libfile-copy-recursive-perl libflac8 libfontconfig1 libgconf-2-4 libgd3
  libgdk-pixbuf2.0-0 libgdk-pixbuf2.0-common libgirepository-1.0-1
  libgphoto2-6 libgphoto2-l10n libgphoto2-port10 libgraphite2-3 libgs9
  libgs9-common libgtk-3-0 libgtk-3-bin libgtk-3-common libgudev-1.0-0
  libgusb2 libharfbuzz0b libice6 libieee1284-3 libijs-0.35 libindicator3-7
  libjasper1 libjbig0 libjbig2dec0 libjpeg8 libjson-glib-1.0-0
  libjson-glib-1.0-common liblcms2-2 liblqr-1-0 libltdl7 libmagickcore-6.q16-2
  libmagickwand-6.q16-2 libnotify4 libogg0 libopenobex1 libpam-systemd
  libpango-1.0-0 libpango1.0-0 libpangocairo-1.0-0 libpangoft2-1.0-0
  libpangox-1.0-0 libpangoxft-1.0-0 libpaper-utils libpaper1 libpixman-1-0
  libpolkit-agent-1-0 libpolkit-backend-1-0 libpolkit-gobject-1-0 libproxy1
  libpulse-mainloop-glib0 libpulse0 librest-0.7-0 librsvg2-2 librsvg2-common
  libsane libsane-common libsane-extras libsane-extras-common libsm6
  libsndfile1 libsoup-gnome2.4-1 libsoup2.4-1 libstartup-notification0 libtdb1
  libthai-data libthai0 libtiff5 libvorbis0a libvorbisenc2 libvorbisfile3
  libvpx1 libwayland-client0 libwayland-cursor0 libx11-xcb1 libxcb-render0
  libxcb-shm0 libxcb-util0 libxcomposite1 libxcursor1 libxdamage1 libxfixes3
  libxft2 libxi6 libxinerama1 libxkbcommon0 libxpm4 libxrandr2 libxrender1
  libxtst6 notification-daemon obex-data-server policykit-1 poppler-data
  python-cairo python-dbus python-dbus-dev python-gi python-gi-cairo
  python-gobject python-gobject-2 sane-utils update-inetd x11-common
Suggested packages:
  bluez-cups bluez-obexd ghostscript-x libcanberra-gtk0 libcanberra-pulse
  cups-common libfftw3-bin libfftw3-dev libgd-tools gphoto2 gtkam gvfs
  libjasper-runtime liblcms2-utils libmagickcore-6.q16-2-extra pulseaudio
  librsvg2-bin hplip hpoj poppler-utils fonts-japanese-mincho
  fonts-ipafont-mincho fonts-japanese-gothic fonts-ipafont-gothic
  fonts-arphic-ukai fonts-arphic-uming fonts-nanum python-dbus-doc
  python-dbus-dbg python-gobject-2-dbg unpaper
The following NEW packages will be installed:
  adwaita-icon-theme at-spi2-core blueman bluetooth colord colord-data
  dconf-gsettings-backend dconf-service fontconfig fontconfig-config
  fonts-dejavu-core fonts-droid gconf-service gconf2-common ghostscript
  gir1.2-appindicator3-0.1 gir1.2-atk-1.0 gir1.2-freedesktop gir1.2-gconf-2.0
  gir1.2-gdkpixbuf-2.0 gir1.2-glib-2.0 gir1.2-gtk-3.0 gir1.2-notify-0.7
  gir1.2-pango-1.0 glib-networking glib-networking-common
  glib-networking-services gnome-icon-theme gsettings-desktop-schemas gsfonts
  hicolor-icon-theme imagemagick-common indicator-application
  libappindicator3-1 libasyncns0 libatk-bridge2.0-0 libatk1.0-0 libatk1.0-data
  libatspi2.0-0 libavahi-client3 libbluetooth3 libcairo-gobject2 libcairo2
  libcanberra-gtk3-0 libcanberra-gtk3-module libcanberra0 libcolord2
  libcolorhug2 libcroco3 libcups2 libcupsfilters1 libcupsimage2 libdatrie1
  libdbus-glib-1-2 libdbusmenu-glib4 libdbusmenu-gtk3-4 libdconf1 libexif12
  libfftw3-double3 libfile-copy-recursive-perl libflac8 libfontconfig1
  libgconf-2-4 libgd3 libgdk-pixbuf2.0-0 libgdk-pixbuf2.0-common
  libgirepository-1.0-1 libgphoto2-6 libgphoto2-l10n libgphoto2-port10
  libgraphite2-3 libgs9 libgs9-common libgtk-3-0 libgtk-3-bin libgtk-3-common
  libgudev-1.0-0 libgusb2 libharfbuzz0b libice6 libieee1284-3 libijs-0.35
  libindicator3-7 libjasper1 libjbig0 libjbig2dec0 libjpeg8 libjson-glib-1.0-0
  libjson-glib-1.0-common liblcms2-2 liblqr-1-0 libltdl7 libmagickcore-6.q16-2
  libmagickwand-6.q16-2 libnotify4 libogg0 libopenobex1 libpam-systemd
  libpango-1.0-0 libpango1.0-0 libpangocairo-1.0-0 libpangoft2-1.0-0
  libpangox-1.0-0 libpangoxft-1.0-0 libpaper-utils libpaper1 libpixman-1-0
  libpolkit-agent-1-0 libpolkit-backend-1-0 libpolkit-gobject-1-0 libproxy1
  libpulse-mainloop-glib0 libpulse0 librest-0.7-0 librsvg2-2 librsvg2-common
  libsane libsane-common libsane-extras libsane-extras-common libsm6
  libsndfile1 libsoup-gnome2.4-1 libsoup2.4-1 libstartup-notification0 libtdb1
  libthai-data libthai0 libtiff5 libvorbis0a libvorbisenc2 libvorbisfile3
  libvpx1 libwayland-client0 libwayland-cursor0 libx11-xcb1 libxcb-render0
  libxcb-shm0 libxcb-util0 libxcomposite1 libxcursor1 libxdamage1 libxfixes3
  libxft2 libxi6 libxinerama1 libxkbcommon0 libxpm4 libxrandr2 libxrender1
  libxtst6 notification-daemon obex-data-server policykit-1 poppler-data
  python-cairo python-dbus python-dbus-dev python-gi python-gi-cairo
  python-gobject python-gobject-2 sane-utils update-inetd x11-common
0 upgraded, 165 newly installed, 0 to remove and 0 not upgraded.
Need to get 65.6 MB of archives.
After this operation, 189 MB of additional disk space will be used.
Do you want to continue? [Y/n] n
Abort.
I don't need the whole graphical environment (I run my Raspberry Pi headless, so it doesn't have a graphical environment).

So I searched some more and found the command bluetoothctl which does pairing in text mode, exactly what I want. It took some trying:
koos@joy:~ $ hcitool scan
Scanning ...
        30:14:11:xx:xx:xx       Mobilinkd TNC2
koos@joy:~ $ bluetoothctl 
[NEW] Controller B8:27:EB:xx:xx:xx joy [default]
bluetooth]# pair
Missing device address argument
[bluetooth]# scan
Missing on/off argument
[bluetooth]# scan on
Discovery started
[CHG] Controller B8:27:EB:xx:xx:xx Discovering: yes
[NEW] Device 9C:20:7B:xx:xx:xx 9C-20-7B-XX-XX-XX
[NEW] Device D0:03:4B:xx:xx:xx D0-03-4B-XX-XX-XX
[NEW] Device F4:F5:D8:xx:xx:xx F4-F5-D8-XX-XX-XX
[NEW] Device 30:14:11:xx:xx:xx 30-14-11-XX-XX-XX
[bluetooth]# pair 30:14:11:xx:xx:xx
Attempting to pair with 30:14:11:xx:xx:xx
Failed to pair: org.bluez.Error.AuthenticationFailed
[bluetooth]# ?
Invalid command
[bluetooth]# help
Available commands:
  list                       List available controllers
  show [ctrl]                Controller information
  select <ctrl>              Select default controller
  devices                    List available devices
  paired-devices             List paired devices
  power <on/off>             Set controller power
  pairable <on/off>          Set controller pairable mode
  discoverable <on/off>      Set controller discoverable mode
  agent <on/off/capability>  Enable/disable agent with given capability
  default-agent              Set agent as the default one
  scan <on/off>              Scan for devices
  info <dev>                 Device information
  pair <dev>                 Pair with device
  trust <dev>                Trust device
  untrust <dev>              Untrust device
  block <dev>                Block device
  unblock <dev>              Unblock device
  remove <dev>               Remove device
  connect <dev>              Connect device
  disconnect <dev>           Disconnect device
  version                    Display version
  quit                       Quit program
[bluetooth]# pairable on
Changing pairable on succeeded
[bluetooth]# pair 30:14:11:xx:xx:xx
Attempting to pair with 30:14:11:xx:xx:xx
[CHG] Device 30:14:11:xx:xx:xx Connected: yes
[CHG] Device 30:14:11:xx:xx:xx Name: Mobilinkd TNC2
[CHG] Device 30:14:11:xx:xx:xx Alias: Mobilinkd TNC2
Failed to pair: org.bluez.Error.AuthenticationFailed
[CHG] Device 30:14:11:xx:xx:xx Connected: no
[bluetooth]# agent on
Agent registered
[bluetooth]# pair 30:14:11:xx:xx:xx
Attempting to pair with 30:14:11:xx:xx:xx
[CHG] Device 30:14:11:xx:xx:xx Connected: yes
Request PIN code
[agent] Enter PIN code: 1234
[CHG] Device 30:14:11:xx:xx:xx UUIDs:
        00001101-0000-1000-8000-00805f9b34fb
[CHG] Device 30:14:11:xx:xx:xx Paired: yes
Pairing successful
[CHG] Device 30:14:11:xx:xx:xx Connected: no
[bluetooth]# 
So I have to set 'scan on', 'pairable on' and 'agent on' to get in a state where a 'pair' command will start the bluetooth pairing process and ask for a pincode.

Now we have a pairing, and I could add a serial connection over this. By hand this can be done with commandline rfcomm:
koos@joy:~ $ sudo rfcomm connect /dev/rfcomm0 30:14:11:xx:xx:xx
Connected /dev/rfcomm0 to 30:14:11:xx:xx:xx on channel 1
Press CTRL-C for hangup
And in another terminal:
koos@joy:~ $ cat /dev/rfcomm0 


== BeRTOS AVR/Mobilinkd TNC2

== Version 2.0.1.571

== Voltage: 4045mV

== Starting.

So there is communications possible! Now to get aprs data from the mobilinkd. This should happen via the KISS protocol, but at this time I have no idea what that would like.

Items before 2017-01-20
This page is created by Koos van den Hout, contact information at the end of my homepage.
Other webprojects: Weatherstation Utrecht Overvecht, Weather maps, Camp Wireless, wireless Internet access at campsites The Virtual Bookcase book reviews, webcam.idefix.net
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